Silence for the fallen

Alan Bridle & Sean Plunkett from Rooty Hill RSL Sub Branch at the Anzac Dawn service at the Minchinbury. Michael Szabath 2014

Alan Bridle & Sean Plunkett from Rooty Hill RSL Sub Branch at the Anzac Dawn service at the Minchinbury. Michael Szabath 2014

Jeffrey, Fiona, Carol & Olivia Boulos at the Anzac Dawn service at the Minchinbury. Michael Szabath 2014

Jeffrey, Fiona, Carol & Olivia Boulos at the Anzac Dawn service at the Minchinbury. Michael Szabath 2014

Ben, Kate,Aschlea, Ryan, Callinan, Rick & Sandra Hierzer with Ken Allsopp who servered in WW2 in the Navy at the Anzac Dawn service at the Minchinbury. Michael Szabath 2014

Ben, Kate,Aschlea, Ryan, Callinan, Rick & Sandra Hierzer with Ken Allsopp who servered in WW2 in the Navy at the Anzac Dawn service at the Minchinbury. Michael Szabath 2014

Anzac Dawn service at the Minchinbury. Michael Szabath 2014

Anzac Dawn service at the Minchinbury. Michael Szabath 2014

ON Friday, April 25 at 5am, several thousand people met at the corner of Reynell and Minchinbury streets in Eastern Creek to march to the Pinegrove Memorial Gardens for the Anzac Day dawn service.

The morning was dark and chilly but that didn't stop many people honouring those who had landed in Gallipoli in 1915.

The marching community kept silent while linking arms, and the only sounds heard were the leading bagpipes and drums. Everyone had one purpose only: to honour those who had served the country.

Bystanders and drivers in vehicles across the Great Western Highway stopped, stood in silence and awe at the large crowd.

Those who attended the service at Minchinbury ranged through the ages; with young children watching on with respect, to families and those wearing medals with pride.

Eight-year-old Luke Bonnici attended the march and dawn service with his family. Every year since he was four, he has attended the Anzac Day service at Minchinbury.

His great-grandfather, John Sidney Burke, served in WWII and Luke proudly wore his medals in commemoration.

"It's a day to remember all the Anzacs who died for us," Luke said.

Throughout the march and speeches. the Australian flag was raised at half mast.

The bugler then sounded The Last Post and the flag was raised to the top of the mast, flapping in the wind just in time for a spectacular sunrise.

Janette Weinert attended in remembrance of her husband Trevor who served in the air force and died 17 years ago.

She said that he spoke very little about his time in the war as it was a sensitive topic after all that he had seen.

Mrs Weinert said that her husband would often say: "No one wins the war".

Participants in the service remembered with pride those who fought to protect a nation's freedom.

As John Clegg mentioned in the prologue, "so let us mourn with pride".

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