Future looks like this



Howard Wood, director of Western Sydney's first 3D printing studio and Australia's 3rd. 26 May, 2014. Picture: Gene Ramirez

Howard Wood, director of Western Sydney's first 3D printing studio and Australia's 3rd. 26 May, 2014. Picture: Gene Ramirez

Western Sydney's first 3D printing studio and Australia's 3rd. 26 May, 2014. Picture: Gene Ramirez

Western Sydney's first 3D printing studio and Australia's 3rd. 26 May, 2014. Picture: Gene Ramirez

Western Sydney's first 3D printing studio and Australia's 3rd. 26 May, 2014. Picture: Gene Ramirez

Western Sydney's first 3D printing studio and Australia's 3rd. 26 May, 2014. Picture: Gene Ramirez

Western Sydney's first 3D printing studio and Australia's 3rd. 26 May, 2014. Picture: Gene Ramirez

Western Sydney's first 3D printing studio and Australia's 3rd. 26 May, 2014. Picture: Gene Ramirez

Western Sydney's first 3D printing studio and Australia's 3rd. 26 May, 2014. Picture: Gene Ramirez

Western Sydney's first 3D printing studio and Australia's 3rd. 26 May, 2014. Picture: Gene Ramirez

3D printers, which allow you to scan objects and print 3D replicas, can be used in a wide variety of applications, with more in development phases.

3D Printing Studios director Stuart Grover unveiled western Sydney's first 3D printing premises at Parramatta's Darcy Street last week.

"One of the uses that we're starting to see now is taking a scan of somebody's heart and 3D printing a replica of that heart so that the surgeon can see it, feel it and touch it before they open a person up to operate," Mr Grover said.

"Researchers are also looking towards creating replacement body parts for people, using their own stem cells.

"The 3D printer basically creates a scaffold from glucose but the actual stem cells are seeded around to create the tissue.

"The applications for the technology are so widely spread, it's like taking a whole shopping mall of goods and being able to print it all from a couple of machines."

Mr Grover said the store was chock-a-block between 5.30 pm and 7.30pm when the day opened the doors to the public.

"The interest has been absolutely unreal.

"There's definitely an appetite for the technology."

After the launch, the Darcy Street studio's machines were left running overnight to demonstrate the technology to passers-by.

"In the morning, I could see all these fingerprints and nose prints where people have been leaning on the shop window's glass to see the technology at work."

In Australia, there are two other public 3D printing studios: One in Melbourne and one in Sydney city — and one soon to open in Fremantle.

"We're looking to get about 30 of them across Australia in the next two years."

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop