Safety not the only message

Driven: Terra Sancta College students Gene Payumo and Laura Sultana change a tyre with Galmatic workshop trainer Eleni Mitakos. Picture: Gene Ramirez

Driven: Terra Sancta College students Gene Payumo and Laura Sultana change a tyre with Galmatic workshop trainer Eleni Mitakos. Picture: Gene Ramirez

CAR maintenance has been added to the more traditional elements of a driver education program for year 11 students at Terra Sancta College.

"The idea came about when one of our female year 12 students had a flat tyre and several male students came to her rescue — only to find they had no idea how to change a tyre," said year 11 student liaison Melissa Peroni.

"Young people are so excited to get their licence but they don't realise the enormous responsibility that goes with driving a car."

At the maintenance workshop last week more than 30 students at the Quakers Hill school changed a tyre, checked oil, and learnt about how airbags and other car safety features function.

Car finance, insurance and registration were also covered in the school's broader three-week driver education program, along with the consequences of poor decision-making while driving.

Ms Peroni said a video on the aftermath of a crash, in which a father who lost a child in a car accident retaliated with murder, was also viewed by the students.

"The students watched a true story about an Australian town that was torn apart by a car accident involving teenagers and speeding," Ms Peroni said.

"They were debriefed at the end and a lengthy discussion was had with them."

Year 11 student Joshua Stephens said the video was effective as it showed how car accidents could affect both the driver and others.

"I feel more confident and responsible in being a driver now because I know how important it is to be safe on the road," he said.

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