Glenwood High students' faith in Duke of Ed

In motion: Glenwood High School student Matthew Hurley tests his newly learnt mountain bike skills for the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme.

In motion: Glenwood High School student Matthew Hurley tests his newly learnt mountain bike skills for the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme.

Sport and spirituality combined for Glenwood High School’s Duke of Edinburgh participants.

The 33 students chose between a 26 kilometre mountain bike ride and 20 kilometre hike to a buddhist monastery for a three day expedition to Wisemans Ferry.

About 21 students departed from the Mills Creek camp ground to complete the hike and 12 completed the bike ride on June 22.

Year 9 student Kayla Robertson said she was nervous about taking part in her first long-distance ride but felt great at the end.

The group hit a challenging hill six kilometres into their chosen route.

‘‘The ride had a good even split of gentle and difficult riding and offered many different challenges as everyone had different skill levels,’’ Kayla said.

‘‘I thought we all did really well. Overall I had a really great ride and I can’t wait for the next one.’’

Year 10 student Caitlin Purss opted for the hike to ‘Wat Buddha Dhamma’ monastery.

‘‘It was a pleasant walk as the early morning fog was rising up through the gullies,’’ she said.

‘‘As we approached the entrance, one of the monks greeted us. We ate lunch all together and began our tour of the place. It was beautiful, natural and very sacred.

‘‘We spent some time in the temple asking questions about their faith, meditating and listening to the monk chanting.’’

The Duke of Edinburgh Award is an internationally recognised self-development program for young people aged 14 to 25. 

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