More than 600 guests gathered for the Ahmadiyya community's annual Interfaith Symposium and Iftar Dinner

Together as one: Leaders from around the state came together to celebrate Ahmadiyya Muslim Association Australia's dinner on July 4.

Together as one: Leaders from around the state came together to celebrate Ahmadiyya Muslim Association Australia's dinner on July 4.

Religious leaders, politicians and members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community marked the holy month of Ramadan on July 4.

More than 600 guests gathered at the Marsden Park Mosque for the Ahmadiyya community's annual Interfaith Symposium and Iftar Dinner, to create religious harmony during the month of fasting for members of the Islamic community.

Religions represented included Islam, Christianity, Judaism and Hinduism.

An iftar is the evening meal at which Muslims end their daily Ramadan fast at sunset.

Imam Kauser, the national president of the Ahmadiyya community, said that though fasting is an integral part of Ramadan, other religions share the practice in their own unique way.

"There may be different ways of practising this tradition, but this is the common ground that can truly unite various faiths once again," Mr Kauser said.

'Leaders from other religions shared their perspective on fasting within their faiths.

Father Gerard O'Dempsey from the Parramatta diocese, said fasting isn't always limited to food.

"Fasting should be extended not just to our food intake, but other distractions in life, for example, the internet," he said.

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