Schofield’s St John Paul II Catholic College students perform 'Stations of the Cross'

COLLECTIVE: (l-r) Students Claire Lynch, 14, Anointed Erhunmwunse, 16, Christian Cipri, 14, Madelyne Leite, 14 and Alyssandra Bessounian, 14. Picture: Isabella Lettini

COLLECTIVE: (l-r) Students Claire Lynch, 14, Anointed Erhunmwunse, 16, Christian Cipri, 14, Madelyne Leite, 14 and Alyssandra Bessounian, 14. Picture: Isabella Lettini

In this day and age most children believe Easter is all about waking up on Sunday morning and hunting for all the chocolate eggs the Easter Bunny has left them the night before.

We hope that our community, through this performance, are inspired to help those who are most in need. - Nal Wijesekera

But for the students of Schofield’s St John Paul II Catholic College, Easter is about “appreciating all the things you might not realise you take for granted and forgiveness”.

“This is depicted through our annual performance of the ‘Stations of the Cross’,” student Madelyne Leite said.

Stations of the Cross or the Way of the Cross, also known as Way of Sorrows or Via Crucis, refers to a series of images depicting Jesus Christ on the day of his crucifixion and accompanying prayers.

“We usually deliver a more traditional performance following the Stations of the Cross but this year we wanted to work on a more modern theme of ‘love your neighbour’,” Madelyne said.

“We’ve put together a very reflective and moving piece. The story starts with refugees who travel by boat to a new country, leaving their families and precious belongings behind.

“The boat breaks in half and the refugees are separated and are attacked by pirates.”

Anointed Erhunmwunse, 16, said the hope and faith is slowly ripped away from the refugees, very much like the ninth Station of the Cross when Jesus falls for the third time.

“The refugees are faced with a challenge. Do they give up, or do they look to God for strength and hope?,” she said.

“There’s a scene where the refugees are surrounded by a fence – that relates to what is happening in the world today – refugees experiencing hardships when they’re put in to refugee camps.”

Teacher Nal Wijesekera, leader of learning religious education, said the importance of the performance is that today we are called to offer hope to all our neighbours, especially those who are marginalised as poor, sick or outcasts.

“Easter is important because it is the honoring and recognising Jesus Christ’s resurrection from the dead, and his promises of eternal life for all who believe in him,” Mr Wijesekera said.

“It is the hope that Jesus has offered all of us.”

‘Stations of the Cross’ will be performed on Thursday, April 6. The students have also performed for Mary Immaculate and St Joseph’s primary schools.

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