A pond that cleans itself has been built by Blacktown Council at William Lawson Park, Prospect.

Blacktown Council's bushland officer Katrina Brown and mayor Stephen Bali check out the floating treatment wetland at William Lawson Park.
Blacktown Council's bushland officer Katrina Brown and mayor Stephen Bali check out the floating treatment wetland at William Lawson Park.

A pond that cleans itself has been built by Blacktown Council at William Lawson Park, Prospect. 

Called a “floating treatment wetland” (FTW), it is the first to be built in a reserve in Blacktown city and uses 1520 locally grown wetland plants to filter stormwater and remove sediments. It can be seen from a viewing platform off Lancelot Street.

Mayor Stephen Bali said it is an innovative approach to capturing nutrients and sediment from stormwater runoff. 

“Because it floats, it rises and falls with floodwaters and is therefore more effective than traditional fixed wetlands or mechanical filters, which have to be constantly cleaned,” Cr Bali said. “The treated stormwater water then flows from the creek to the river system, as better quality water thanks to the FTW treatment.”  

The floating treatment wetland at William Lawson Park.

The floating treatment wetland at William Lawson Park.

It has an area of 100 square metres.

“FTWs use plants growing on a mat floating on the surface of the water rather than planted directly in the ground,” council’s bushland officer, Katrina Brown, said.

“Plant roots hang beneath a floating mat and provide a large surface area for growth, which is an important part of the water treatment process.

“These systems can tolerate typical water depth fluctuations without the risk of the plants becoming flooded and stressed.”