Incinerator proponents The Next Generation dismiss fears in new submission

The energy-from-waste plant would be located about 900 metres from the nearest home in Minchinbury. Picture: The Next Generation
The energy-from-waste plant would be located about 900 metres from the nearest home in Minchinbury. Picture: The Next Generation

The proponent of an incinerator to be built at Eastern Creek has responded to its critics in a submission to the state’s planning department.

In its submission, The Next Generation responded to the more than 1000 submissions against its proposal, and dismissed the health and environmental concerns levelled at the facility.

Both NSW Health and the Environmental Protection Authority have formally opposed the proposal, but Dial A Dump chief executive Chris Biggs was confident the new submission would allay any fears. 

“We have worked closely with a range of government departments and independent experts, backed up by extensive technical reports, to address the key issues in our submission,” he said.

Dial A Dump director Ian Malouf speaks before the Upper House inquiry in August. Picture: 9 News

Dial A Dump director Ian Malouf speaks before the Upper House inquiry in August. Picture: 9 News

The report by Urbis consultants states that any potential health impacts on the immediate and greater community were “low or acceptable”.

It said “fail safe” mechanisms meant TNG could rule out harmful waste materials, including asbestos, making their way into the plant’s fuel stream.

The submission also reiterated the proponent was only seeking approval for stage one of the project – which would burn 550,000 tonnes of waste per year.

This was revealed during an Upper House inquiry into energy from waste technology, sparked by TNG’s application, in June.

Detractors had often highlighted the plant’s capacity to burn more than one million tonnes of waste per year as a key rallying point for opponents.

Community members have staged several protests against the plans. Picture: Isabella Lettini

Community members have staged several protests against the plans. Picture: Isabella Lettini

No Incinerator for Western Sydney spokeswoman Melinda Wilson said TNG’s claims that it only ever sought approval for a phased development was “a lie”.

“The original proposal was to get approval for stage on and two,” Ms Wilson said.

“We are having so much trouble getting to the truth.

“If they’re like this now, how can the community feel comforted that they will do the right thing?”

Ms Wilson said down-sizing the proposal changed nothing for residents living near the site.

“Most Incinerators overseas are this size and communities living in close proximity are reporting health effects such as respiratory problems and chronic headaches,” she said.

Both sides of the debate are waiting on a report following the Upper House inquiry.

TNG’s plans are set to go before the independent Planning Assessment Commission.